Being Breath

stories from the wilderness of everyday life

The Subway Perspective

First, I am feeling a great deal of gratitude for all of the well wishes received for my birthday...and want to extend a thanks to two people here:

 

First, Julia Frehner spun a beautiful perspective, one that reminds us to look down the rabbit hole and keep wonder alive.  I am honored for the mention in her post.

Second, Kathy (of Bliss Habits), a very dear friend who I hope to someday meet in person (!), wrote one of the kindest tributes I have EVER received.  Please take a minute to visit it here (and be sure to look around her site for treasure troves of wisdom!)

 

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As we head into the weekend and possibly away from the computers (*gasp*), I want to send us off with a reminder.

 

I came across a tale I had heard before...one that is worth sharing here.  (Apparently I am in the middle of too many books because I can't find the one where I just saw it....but the story itself is from Stephen Covey's The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.  I found the story on the internet here.)

 

Stephen Covey was sitting quietly among other folks in a subway car; some were reading, others looking out the window.  The only sound was the rhythmic rumbling of the subway train.  Then the train made a stop and a man and his children entered the subway car.  Instantly the noise level changed. 

The children ran wild, shouting, screaming, and wrestling, while their father simply put his head down and closed his eyes. 

Frustrated, Covey finally turned to the father and said, “Sir, perhaps you could restore order here by telling your children to come back and sit down.” 

“Oh, you are right. I am so sorry. I guess I should do something about them, but I’m sort of at a loss right now. We just came from the hospital. Their mother died an hour ago and I guess they don’t know how to handle it either.”

 

As you continue to interact on this computer (phone?) with faceless others, as you go about your shopping or errands and meet the eyes of strangers, as you chat casually with acquaintances and life-long friends...remember we all carry with us deep stories.  We look out at the world through different eyes and varying perspectives.  We all want happiness and freedom from suffering.

 

See the other in yourself and yourself in other and you will be free from judgment; free, perhaps, to smile and deeply acknowledge.

 

Namaste.